Dangers in EMS

I’m sure you’ve heard about all the news stories of firefighters and EMS personnel getting attacked, but what you might not know is that it’s much more common than you think. Not only is it common, but it’s also been going on much longer than they portray on the news. We all know the dangers of firefighting; however, no one really talks about how dangerous it is to work on an ambulance.

First of all, we all work in a big toaster that crumples in an instant. You add in driving at high speeds with lights and sirens, and now you have a speeding death trap. People already have a hard enough time driving, but as soon as drivers hear those sirens and see those lights they forget everything they knew. They are like deer in headlights. Also we can’t always wear our seat belts while in the back with patients because we have to be able to move around and do different things. Sometimes we get thrown around or worse get injured if an accident occurs.

What’s talked about less in public and even in EMT/Medic classes are the other dangers EMS presents. It is very possible and common to get violent patients. Here in Vegas we have a large population of mental health patients that unfortunately do not treat it or control it. Whether it’s that person’s fault or they are unable to get the treatment they need either way we run many psychiatric calls. Psychiatric patients can be very unpredictable, and can become dangerous in an instant. If they decide to get violent there is not much room in the back of an ambulance to get away. The patient is now endangering the life of an EMS employee and their own. We have to be able to protect ourselves as well as our partners and patients, and in doing so we can get injured. This also goes for anyone who could have an altered mental status due to drugs/alcohol or a medical problem.

Recently we’ve had to start worrying about getting attacked for no reason. Firefighters and EMS have a target on their backs. Is it because people relate us with the police? It’s possible, but for whatever reason it’s another danger to add to the job. In school they teach us “scene safety,” which is making sure the scene is safe before entering. That’s all good and dandy, but we can’t always know if a scene is safe or the scene can change while we are there. For example about a year ago my husband was working, and received a call to go to a patient’s home late at night. Him and his partner arrived at the address that was given to them and knocked on the door. To my husband’s surprise he was met at the door with a gun to his head. Long story short my husband is fine, and the gentleman put the gun down. Apparently they had been given the wrong address and this man was not happy someone was knocking on his door late at night.  I’ve heard many similar stories. I’m sure many of you heard about the man who was swinging a knife around at a crew here in Vegas, and ended up getting on top of the ambulance. Scenes can be unpredictable just like our patients.

At the end of the day we have to trust our partners, our firefighters, and our police. We all have to work as a team to stay safe, and keep the people we are trying to help safe.

So there is a little peak into the things we deal with out there. Why do we face these dangers and put our lives at risk? “So others may live.” This job isn’t for everyone, but for those of us who do it keep rocking it and stay safe.

 

Pregnant on an Ambulance

So what is it like to be pregnant and working on an ambulance in Las Vegas?

  1. It’s hot as hell! I’m not using hell as a curse word here; I literally think hell is this hot. Working in the summers in Vegas are hot enough, but add in the pregnancy hot flashes and you’ve got an uncomfortable situation. I sweat in places I didn’t know you could sweat in. Or as I like to tell my husband I am glistening in places I didn’t know glistened. TMI? Oh stop you’ve had these thoughts before I’m just saying them out loud…or writing them out loud.
  2. It’s painful. All the aches and pains that come with pregnancy; which I happily endure for my little boy, are increased by sitting in a cramped space for 12 hours. We’ve all been on a road trip before, and you all must know how uncomfortable it is to sit for hours at a time. Now just add a 10 pound bowling ball to your stomach, and you’ll start to experience what I do. It’s fun…I say with a sarcastic smile.
  3. I have to pee all the time!!! Everyone knows that’s a common side effect of being pregnant, but I don’t always have a bathroom nearby when the urge hits. There are times we are running calls, and I have to wait until we get to a hospital. Other times we are sitting at a post waiting for calls, and there are no bathrooms around or ones you really want to use. So there is a lot of holding it and hoping I don’t sneeze.
  4. Everyone asking, “You’re still working?!” Yes, yes I am still working. I can see where people could be confused about this, but an uncomplicated pregnancy is not considered a disability. I get the same amount of maternity leave as anyone else would. Trust me there are times that I wish I was put on light duty or I could take more time off especially this late in the game. So if you do see me around let me answer your question before you ask it, “yes I am still working for a few more weeks.”

My sweet husband gets a lot of complaint text messages and lets me vent. Without him I don’t know what I would do. In the end, I put up with the heat, the aches, and the having to pee all the time for two reasons. The first reason being my precious son that I cannot wait to meet. The second reason being to help people. If you do this job you know we deal with a lot of non-emergent calls to put it nicely, but on the off chance I actually get to help people or save a life that’s what makes it worth it.

Who Am I, and Why A Blog?

Maternity_DeMille-057Hello all and welcome to my new and first blog!

I wanted to start off by introducing myself. My name is Charlytte or Char for short. I was born and raised in Las Vegas with my only sister. I’m married to a great man named Brennan for two years now, and we are expecting our first child, Jackson, in July. We live in a small house in Henderson, NV with our German Shepard named Thor. I am an Advanced EMT in Las Vegas, and my husband is a Paramedic. I also work part-time at my parents’ construction company, Showcase Contracting. It’s nice to meet you all.

Now that you know a little bit about me you must be wondering why I decided to start a blog or what expert advice I plan to give to you all. Well first off I am no fitness freak or nutrition guru, and I’m not a fashionista or makeup artist. Let’s be honest I barely know how to do my own makeup and hair let alone keep up with the most recent fashion trends. I wear what’s comfortable, I eat what tastes good, and I try to get some type of physical activity in. I’m just a woman in her 20s, a soon to be mom, and wife trying to figure out this thing called life. You may think I’ve got it all figured out. You might think oh she has a family, a house, and a career what more could she want. Unfortunately I am still lost, and don’t know what I want to do or be when I grow up. I decided to start a blog because I felt as though we had plenty of blogs about the perfect makeup look or best workout plan, but not enough on normal problems from normal people. I feel like I can relate to many people trying to learn how to adult. So if you want a real person’s opinion or advice or just to read about funny, sad, day-to-day life events this is the spot. I hope what I can share can help you in some aspect whether it be just pure entertainment or you happen to be going through something similar and need to know someone else out there feels the way you do. So here I am a mommy(soon-to-be), a wife, and myself and all three make up who I am. Watch me stumble through life while I figure out how to be an amazing mom, an awesome wife, and myself.

I appreciate you reading my first blog post, and I hope you return for more. Feel free to post comments and ask questions I would love to hear from you.